Binga Wall Basket S

19,50 Inc. BTW

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Description

Binga Baskets

Binga Baskets are traditionally woven by the women of the Binga district in Zimbabwe and are decorative pieces for your household.
Basket walls are hip and happening and they form a nice income for Tonga women who weave them.

That means that  you can buy something beautiful for your house,  and she can live for a week..

Many Tonga women utilize traditional weaving techniques to create intricately patterned baskets. All natural and locally harvested materials – such as wild grasses, small vines, and palm leaves dyed with tree bark are turned into Binga baskets.
The largest sized bowls are still used by the baTonga people for their original purpose of winnowing grains.

Binga baskets are woven using the over and under style of ‘simple’ weaving and a 16 inch diameter basket can take around 3 days to complete. The baskets are finished using a coiled rim with a distinctive herringbone pattern.

These baskets are named for the remote Binga district – home to the displaced baTonga people. In the early 1960’s, their fertile lands on the Zambezi river shore were permanently buried in water during construction of the world’s largest man-made lake.

The damming of the mighty Zambezi created Lake Kariba, which holds four times the water as China’s three gorges dam. As the lake filled, the Batonga tribe were forced to relocate to their current lands that are barren and difficult to farm in Northwest Zimbabwe. There are also Batonga people – separated from their families by the 2,000 square mile lake – that live in the South of the neighboring country of Zambia.

Additional information

Size

Small, Medium